Facebook F8 and BCON

Content Marketing

Recently, two very important conferences have taken place. One was in Toronto: BCON. The other in San Francisco: Facebook F8. I attended BCON here in Toronto and followed the F8 conference via updates from Facebook.

I also happened to write about these two events.

I wrote about my 5 takeaways from BCON on the Active International blog. BCON is a conference focusing on how brands and publishers can continue to use and iterate on Branded Content.

Active’s blog also hosted a very short piece on some marketing highlights from Facebook’s F8 conference.

Lastly, I finally submitted another piece to itbusiness.ca. I’ve been a regular contributor to itbusiness but recent work commitments have seen my contributions dwindle. Hopefully this will increase again over time.  I wrote about the 4 things that mattered at the Facebook F8 conference.

I hope you enjoy the articles!

My latest on the Catalyst blog: The Sky Is Not Falling

Content Marketing: The sky Is Not Falling
The Sky Is Not Falling

Content marketing has been in the news recently. Well, at least the type of news I tend to consume. I work in the digital content space so I hear and read about people bemoaning the death of content marketing just as much as pundits applaud the benefits of content marketing.

Earlier this week I wrote a piece on content marketing on the Catalyst website. It is in direct response to a piece written by Mark W. Schaefer. I hope you enjoy it.

Read the piece here.

Content Marketing – #SMWTO #SMW13

Yesterday I attended a session that was part of this year’s Social Media Week – Toronto.  I was a little underwhelmed at the presentation. It was 60% promotional and 40% thought leadership and knowledge.

content marketing

One of the points I heavily disagreed with was the speaker’s claim (and by extension the agency he works for) that there are only 5 “secrets” to successful content marketing:

  1. engaging
  2. rich media
  3. mobile
  4. shareable
  5. call to action

One could argue (and I would be in that camp) that these 5 are incorrect. And they are not even secrets. However, one things is missing: DATA. How can a professional or company claim to create successful content when they are not including the metrics and data to create content?

One of the most important things when creating content is to understand the brand and the consumer. And one of the ways we do this is understanding how people talk about a brand online (social and web) and how they behave on that brand’s website.

Without this knowledge, content that is created is only based on assumptions. We have access to barrels of data. We must use it for ourselves and for our clients if we really want to create engaging content that delivers any sort of measurable ROI.

Your thoughts?