Jeremiah Brown: The 4 Year Olympian – Interview

karim kanji with jeremiah brown

Jeremiah Brown was part of Team Canada’s Men’s 8 rowing team that captured the silver medal at the London 2012 Olympic Games. He is also the author of the new book, The 4 Year Olympian (published by Dundurn Press).

This is Episode #127.

Here are some of the things we discussed:

  • How being bullied as a kid helped form his character.
  • His stint in jail after robbing a delivery man.
  • How his relationship with Amy, his ex-girlfriend helped his stay focused on training and his Olympic dream.
  • Jeremiah Brown’s two most important coaches: Coach Riley (his football coach at Hamilton’s McMaster University) and Doug White (his rowing coach).
  • How Jeremiah Brown made the McMaster football team as a walk-on.
  • His 4 year journey to the Olympics (including all his failures and stumbles)
  • The amount of money Team Canada athletes make to be full-time athletes
  • Why Jeremiah Brown decided to leave the rowing team and not pursue a Gold medal in 2016.
  • His work with the Canadian Olympic Committee’s Game Plan program.

Jeremiah Brown’s next challenge: Playing drums in a successful stadium-filling band!

Listen below:

Girth Radio
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You can also subscribe to the podcast via RSS Feed if you’re so inclined.

Recorded live at Girth Radio.

Music by Afraaz Mulji and Arkells.

If you liked this episode you will also like:

podcast show notes karim kanji jeremiah brown

Book Report: Scarborough

Trailer for Scarborough: a novel from CEHernandez on Vimeo.

Episode #113: Terry Fallis

terry fallis and karim kanji

Terry Fallis is an award-winning Canadian author of six best sellers and co-founder of PR company, Thornley Fallis.

We spoke about his time in politics, how he became an author, and how his books reflect the various conversations we are having in today’s political discourse.

Listen below:

Girth Radio
MixCloud 
Apple Podcasts
Google Play Music
Stitcher 
TuneIn
Pocket Casts
You can also subscribe to the podcast via RSS Feed if you’re so inclined.

Recorded live at Girth Radio.
Music by Afraaz Mulji.

If you enjoyed this episode you’ll also like:

Ep106: Ed Keenan, Toronto Star
Ep104: MP Arif Virani
Ep99: Richard Peddie, MLSE

Listen to other Girth Radio podcasts like The Freeze with Brian and Tyler.

Book Report: The High Road

reading | main street unionville | karim kanji

After taking forever to read a Terry Fallis book (One Brother Shy) I just completed my second Fallis book, The High Road.

It should come to no surprise to people who know Fallis that he’s written a story (The High Road is a sequel to his first book, The Best Laid Plans) about politics. For almost 5 years Fallis with the Liberal Party as the federal and provincial levels. After that, Fallis was a government affairs and communication consultant with a global PR firm.

While reading these latest exploits of protagonists Daniel Addison and Angus McLintock I couldn’t help but wonder if Fallis was giving us all an inside look into the Canadian political machinery. This is something we’ll definitely talk about when Fallis comes on my podcast in March!

Nonetheless, Fallis is at his best in this novel about two unlikely friends who take on the political establishment in another comedy jewel.

Book Report: One Brother Shy

One of my friends, Dave Fleet, used to work for the agency Thornley Fallis. That’s when I probably first heard about Terry Fallis. Then came the popular MeetUps I used to attend in Toronto around media, PR and social media.

I think I heard about his podcast, Inside PR. But I definitely became aware  of him when his novel, The Best Laid Plans, was made into a TV series of the same name.

And it’s taken me this long to finally read one of his book, One Brother Shy.

It’s been a while since I’ve read a book so funny. The first book(s) I remember reading that made me laugh was Robert Ludlum’s Road to Omaha and Road To Gandolfo.

Thanks Terry for writing a wickedly funny book set (for the most part) in Canada.

I see a little bit of Alex MacAskill in me. Naturally, I’m an introvert. However, unlike Alex, I’m born this way. Also like Alex, I can be gregarious as well.

If you’re looking for a book about family, overcoming setbacks, and international adventure with a touch of funny this is the book for you. Pick it up at your favourite local bookstore, Amazon, or public library.

Book Report: Letterman: The Last Giant of Late Night

While reading Jason Zinoman’s book, Letterman: The Last Giant of Late Night . I was reminded of many moments that I got to watch over the years. You see, I was, and remain, a huge fan of David Letterman.

While I stopped actively watching TV in 2000 (I got married and we decided to not get cable) I still followed the Letterman and his show online. I remember sneaking down the stairs every night just before 12:30am to watch his 3 joke opening monologue, Stupid Pet Tricks, calling familiar strangers on the phone, drop stuff off the building and interview Richard Simmons for the hundredth time. I had both of his Top Ten List books and a framed Time magazine cover on my bedroom wall. I even once had tickets to go see his Late Night show in New York City. I wished I actually asked my parents to help me get there. Sigh. And even after I got married I still had his photo in my wallet. Yes. I was a huge.

However, some parts of the book upset me a bit. For example, I always thought the character of David Letterman that I saw on TV was just that. A character. Yet, Zinoman writes that that was actually the real Letterman. I struggle with the notion that Letterman was never satisfied with his show/success or was really angry underneath it all.

Letterman now has his popular Netflix show, My Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman. Thank goodness I don’t need TV to watch!

Thanks Jason for writing this book. And thanks Dave for continuing to make us laugh.

Book Report: The Marriott Cell by Mohamed Fahmy

The Marriot Cell

We recently went back to visiting our local library branches.

The first book I borrowed was Mohamed Fahmy’s “The Marriott Cell.”

Fahmy is a former CNN and Al Jazeera  journalist who was wrongly imprisoned on charges of being a member of a terrorist organization. He would go on to spend over 400 days in prison including Egypt’s infamous prison for terrorists Scorpion Prison.

In today’s climate of “fake news” and the disintegration of local news his story is a chilling reminder that one of the main roles of journalists is to hold power to account.

To learn more about Mohamed Fahmy visit his Twitter account.

Book Review: The funniest and most honest book ever was written by Rob Delaney

I was given Rob Delaney’s book by good friends of mine for my last birthday. I was putting it off as I tried to finish the book I was then reading. don’t ask me what it was.

Delaney has been described as the funniest man on Twitter. He just might be that if you are to believe what “they” say. However, he is undoubtedly one of the funniest writers as well. Delaney has written a book that is honest, funny, sad, reflective, challenging and thought provoking. Most of the time, I felt multiple emotions in one chapter.

This is one of those books that leaves you begging for more when you’re done. It is a quick read. not because of the length but because it’s a book you will never want to put down.

It is also a book that will make you reflect on what you’re doing in life. You may not change careers or start to believe in a God. But you may start to live a little out on the edge.

Pick this up as a gift. for yourself. you deserve it.

rob delaney
rob delaney